10 Tips to Beat Insomnia

10 Tips to Beat Insomnia | SpineDeck®

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This week we are going to provide some value, and top 10 tips, on a subject we have been asked a lot about recently. 

Insomnia

Insomnia means you regularly have problems sleeping. It usually gets better by changing your sleeping habits.


Check if you have insomnia

You have insomnia if you regularly:

  • find it hard to go to sleep
  • wake up several times during the night
  • lie awake at night
  • wake up early and cannot go back to sleep
  • still feel tired after waking up
  • find it hard to nap during the day even though you're tired
  • feel tired and irritable during the day
  • find it difficult to concentrate during the day because you're tired

If you have insomnia for a short time (less than 3 months) it’s called short-term insomnia. Insomnia that lasts 3 months or longer is called long-term insomnia.

How much sleep you need

Everyone needs different amounts of sleep.

On average:

  • adults need 7 to 9 hours
  • children need 9 to 13 hours
  • toddlers and babies need 12 to 17 hours

You probably do not get enough sleep if you're constantly tired during the day.

What causes insomnia

The most common causes are:

  • stress, anxiety or depression
  • noise
  • a room that's too hot or cold
  • uncomfortable beds
  • alcohol, caffeine or nicotine
  • recreational drugs like cocaine or ecstasy
  • jet lag
  • shift work



Insomnia and anxiety


Anxiety can cause insomnia, and insomnia can cause anxiety. This can result in a self-perpetuating cycle that may lead to chronic insomnia.

Short-term anxiety develops when you worry frequently about the same specific issue, such as work or your personal relationships.

Short-term anxiety usually goes away once the issue is resolved. Your sleep should return to normal as well.

People can also be diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or panic disorder. These disorders can result in varying degrees of insomnia.

The causes of anxiety disorders aren’t completely understood. Treatment is usually long term and includes a combination of therapy and medications.

The same lifestyle and behavioral practices recommended for other forms of insomnia help diminish anxiety-related insomnia, such as restricting stressful topics of conversation to the daytime.

Simple lifestyle changes can make a world of difference to your quality of sleep.

10 tips for a more restful night

Keep regular sleep hours

Going to bed and getting up at roughly the same time every day will programme your body to sleep better. Choose a time when you're likely to feel tired and sleepy.

Create a restful sleeping environment

Your bedroom should be a peaceful place for rest and sleep. Temperature, lighting and noise should be controlled so that your bedroom environment helps you to fall (and stay) asleep.

If you have a pet that sleeps in the room with you, consider moving it somewhere else if it often disturbs you in the night.

Make sure your bed is comfortable

It's difficult to get restful sleep on a mattress that's too soft or too hard, or a bed that's too small or old.

Exercise regularly

Moderate exercise on a regular basis, such as swimming or walking, can help relieve some of the tension built up over the day. But make sure you do not do vigorous exercise, such as running or the gym, too close to bedtime, as it may keep you awake.

Cut down on caffeine

Cut down on caffeine in tea, coffee, energy drinks or colas, especially in the evening. Caffeine interferes with the process of falling asleep, and also prevents deep sleep. Instead, have a warm, milky drink or herbal tea.

Do not over-indulge

Too much food or alcohol, especially late at night, can interrupt your sleep patterns. Alcohol may help you to fall asleep initially, but it will disrupt your sleep later on in the night.

Do not smoke

Nicotine is a stimulant. People who smoke take longer to fall asleep, wake up more frequently, and often have more disrupted sleep.

Try to relax before going to bed

Have a warm bath, listen to quiet music or do some gentle yoga to relax your mind and body. Do not use your computer of any screen for that matter. Your personal doctor may be able to recommend a helpful relaxation music genre.

Write away your worries

If you tend to lie in bed thinking about everything you have to do tomorrow, set aside time before bedtime to make plans for the next day. The aim is to avoid doing these things when you're in bed, trying to sleep.

If you cannot sleep, get up

If you cannot sleep, do not lie there worrying about it. Get up and do something you find relaxing until you feel sleepy again, then go back to bed.

Make an appointment to see your local doctor if lack of sleep is persistent and it's affecting your daily life.

Takeaways

Insomnia isn’t just a nuisance or a small inconvenience. It’s a real sleep disorder, and it can be treated.

If you think you have insomnia, talk to your doctor. They can help explore possible causes and develop a safe and appropriate treatment plan based on your healthcare needs.



That is it for this week's simple surprise. We would love to hear if this has helped you, so please feel free to always engage with us on any social media platform or email. 

Until next week, sleep well!


Ciao😊


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